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Keep your Finished Basement Dry

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You have spent thousands of dollars finishing your basement.
You finally have your man cave ready. But, is it fully protected?

This article from wiki how covers the required steps to ensure that your finished basement is protected from flooding.

Your finished basement is your pride and joy. You’ve already spent thousands of dollars and countless hours converting your concrete dungeon into comfortable living space.

The last thing you need is a tidal pool of ground water or sewage infiltrating your new home office or wet bar. A simple flash flood or a cresting creek can easily transform your new carpeting into a massive, moldy sponge.

Your basement isn’t “finished” without some flood prevention and basement waterproofing steps, actions to protect your home when flooding does occur and an emergency plan to provide for your family’s welfare until you can return to your home. You need layers of protection for the adequate safety of your family and property.

The first thing to do is to focus on prevention. Long before you’re in a flooding situation, look around your property for ways to divert rain water away from your home. Important considerations are extending rain gutter down spouts away from your home and making sure the grade of your yard surfaces slope away from your home.

Clean the rain gutters in the spring and after all the leaves have come down in the fall. Blocked gutters will cause all of the roof water to dump directly against your foundation, increasing the likelihood of basement flooding.

Extend the rain gutter downspouts well out and away from your home. Do not connect the downspouts to your foundation footer drain tiles or to underground dry wells. This will only cause the roof water to further saturate the ground and cause flooding in your basement.

Walk around outside in your yard during a heavy rain storm. Watch to see if water is ponding next to your home and if surface water is being directed toward your home. If this is the case, seek a local landscaper or excavation contractor for advice on ways to regrade your yard so the surface water is directed away from your home.

Provide emergency power. Install an automatic emergency generator to provide electric service for essential circuits like your furnace or electric heat, well pump, refrigerator, septic tank pump and sump pump in the case when power is lost. Without emergency backup power, you may return home to unnecessary basement flooding, frozen water pipes and a flooded septic tank.

Install a sump pump. An automatic sump pump should help keep water leakage normal amounts of rainfall from building up in the basement. As long as the sump pump tank has an opening in the lid, the sump pump will act like a huge floor drain and keep the water from getting deep.

Install a backup sump pump. The sump pump is your first line of defense against basement flooding. However, the most reliable sump pump available in the industry is still a mechanic device and can fail. A backup sump pump system, preferably with at least a battery-operated pump, configured with a switch device to begin working if the main is out of commission, greatly reduces the chance of flood. Some systems come with additional security features such as an alarm that goes off whenever the battery operated is started.

Remember that Basement Solutions can assist you with any issues regarding basement waterproofing, foundation repair and much more.
Visit us at basements911.com or call us at 610-495-9111.